Dublin studio Grafton Architects has installed rows of textured concrete monoliths inside the V&A museum’s tapestry gallery, referencing an ancient script and prehistoric standing stones. This installation is one of the must see at London Design Festical 2015.

Grafton Architects worked with materials specialists Graphic Relief to create The Ogham Wall – 23 freestanding rectangular columns that stand in the dark gallery.

The project takes its name from the Irish Ogham alphabet, used on monuments and manuscripts from 4th to the 9th century AD. Its symbols are made up of perpendicular and crossing angled lines, which informed the layout of Grafton’s installation.

Related: An exhibition of mid-century modern furniture and contemporary lighting at London Design Festival 2015

The Orgham Wall at the VA London Design Festival 2015 1 The Orgham Wall at the V&A | London Design Festival 2015The Orgham Wall at the VA London Design Festival 2015 1

Textures and shapes cast into the surfaces with metal powder are based on photographs of these different species of tree, including silver fir, birch, elder and holly.

The concrete columns also reference prehistoric stone monuments like Stonehenge in England and Drombeg Stone Circle in Ireland.

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The blocks in The Ogham Wall each measure 2.7 metres tall but have varying widths. They are arranged in two lines – some are clustered together in pairs or small groups, while others stand alone.

The tops are held in place by metal bracing elements to stop them from toppling over and creating “a domino effect”.

Related: London Design Festival 2015 – Magic Lighting Installation at V&A Museum

The Orgham Wall at the V&A  London Design Festival 2015 The Orgham Wall at the V&A | London Design Festival 2015The Orgham Wall at the VA London Design Festival 2015

Groupings were created to frame views of the tapestries that hang from the walls of the gallery, which Farrell described as “the televisions of the 15th century”.

Although they appear to be made of solid concrete, the pillars are hollow and filled with foam. The heaviest weighs 400 kilograms, while the lightest come in at 250 kilograms.

Visitors are encouraged to walk between them and touch the material to heighten their experience of the space.

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