CRG Architects has unveiled a proposal to replace slum housing with a pair of skyscrapers comprising stacks of brightly coloured shipping containers.

Shipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG Architects Shipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG ArchitectsShipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG Architects

CRG Architects, which has offices in China and Nigeria, came up with the concept for Container Skyscraper to provide temporary accommodation to replace slum housing in developing countries.

The firm proposes that recycled shipping containers could be stacked to create high-density, cost-effective housing in urban areas – building on a string of inventive proposals for the storage structures from architects and designers, varying from a cross-shaped micro home to a fan-like photography studio.

Shipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG Architects Shipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG ArchitectsShipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG Architects

“Cities are facing unprecedented demographic, environmental, economic, social and spatial challenges,” said architect Carlos Gomez.

“There has been a phenomenal shift towards urbanisation, with six out of every 10 people in the world expected to reside in urban areas by 2030.”

Shipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG Architects Shipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG ArchitectsShipping container skyscraper unveiled by CRG Architects 1

“In the absence of effective urban planning, the consequences of this rapid urbanisation will be dramatic,” Gomez added. “In many places around the world, the effects can already be felt.”

Approximately 2,500 containers would be needed to complete the proposed scheme, which could house up to 5,000 people, according to the architects.

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The steel containers would be supported by a concrete structure and arranged with their edges overlapping to create two cylindrical towers – one measuring 400 metres in height and the other 200 metres.